I got a Rust job.

I have been a hobbyist Rust programmer for about five years now. I have given a couple of conference talks, I’ve written a few crates, and I almost understand lifetimes. All of my personal projects since 2014 have been written in Rust, and it is what I would consider my “main” language. The qualifier “hobbyist” is necessary not because I think my Rust skills are lesser than a professional, not because I choose to write exclusively hobby projects in Rust and think it is insufficient for professional work, not because I myself am a purely hobbyist programmer, but working in Rust is not really an option. There are a few big names out there, but Rust adoption in the professional world is minimal at best. Similar to Haskell, another language I am fond of, jobs in Rust are generally few, contract-based, far-between, and unstable. Well, I have got some exciting news.

I work in Rust now.

This might seem insignificant if you are outside the world of programming language fandom or even outside the world of software and programming in general. But to me, this is a realization of something I’ve worked towards for five years. And now that I’m here, I’m seeing that Rust adoption is actually taking off right now.

I write systems code (whatever that means). Proprietary transport level messaging protocols. It is a great use case for Rust, and I look forward to my relationship with Rust evolving into the kind between a professional and a tool.

My first task was reconciling futures version issues within generated protocol buffer code. Maybe this is actually the beginning of the end.

 
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